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Myanmar Awakens

Myanmar emerges from decades of isolation. Following a general election in 2010— which installed a civilian government albeit with still considerable military influence—Myanmar has undertaken significant political, economic and policy reforms.

Cyn-Young Park

Meeting Myanmar’s Iconic Lady

Over the course of our eleven-month “re-engagement” with Myanmar and my three trips to the country since June, I have discussed prospects for the country with literally hundreds of people. In a September op-ed, I quoted Rudyard Kipling who referred to the country as "quite unlike any land you know about" in his 1898 collection Letters from the East and these discussions leave me convinced that this century-old observation holds true.

Stephen P. Groff

Dialogues on Change: Up Close with Aung San Suu Kyi

My second meeting with Daw Aung San Suu Kyi was in early November. I had returned to the country to meet with officials and discuss next steps following our Board’s approval of our interim country partnership strategy. Following a variety of meetings in Yangon and Nay Pyi Taw, we returned to her residence on the outskirts of the capital. Madame Suu Kyi again greeted us at the entrance to her home and ushered us to the same table.

Stephen P. Groff

PRC's incoming leaders face tough economic challenges

In recent discussions that I have had with decision makers and economists working on People’s Republic of China (PRC), the question on the incoming leadership’s approach to economic reforms inevitably comes up. Is the transition to new leadership a good opportunity to rethink economic policies?

Inclusive and green growth: Why is it so elusive?

“Inclusive growth” and “green growth” are two buzzwords that we often hear in the development sphere nowadays. This is not surprising since these two form key part of many development strategies. While Asia has done extremely well in expanding its economies in the last two to three decades, rapid growth has brought with it rising inequality—within and across countries. It has also badly damaged the environment along the way.

Bindu N. Lohani

Why Should People’s Republic of China Unlock Services?

A well-developed services sector plays a major role in improving production efficiency and promoting technical progress and innovation. The services sector has expanded rapidly in the People’s Republic of China (PRC) since economic reform was launched in 1979, and particularly after PRC joined the World Trade Organization in 2001. However, the size of the sector as a share of GDP appears to be significantly smaller than expected based on PRC's income level and development stage.

Yolanda Fernandez Lommen

Reforms high on agenda of People’s Republic of China’s new leaders

In March 2013, the National People’s Congress (NPC) of the People’s Republic of China (PRC) will convene to appoint the new General Secretary of the Communist Party Xi Jinping as President. At the same time, Li Keqiang is expected to be confirmed as Premier heading a newly appointed State Council.

Majority of families in Bhutan depend on agriculture and related activities for their livelihood.

Why Bhutan must balance the material and spiritual needs of her people

Bhutan, located in the eastern Himalayas, is a small landlocked country between the People’s Republic of China (PRC) and India. Virtually the entire country is mountainous. Despite challenging geography and limited connection to the global markets, the country managed to ignite and sustain strong economic growth by unlocking its hydro potential.

Cyn-Young Park

Post 2015 agenda: For whom is the world changing fast?

For the past 6 months, my work spins around the Post 2015 development agenda, the successor of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).  It is amazing to follow the numerous tweets, blogs, working papers, which are sprouting out daily and which discuss old and new aspects of the Post 2015 development agenda.

Susann Roth

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