Social development and protection

  • Sukuk: A key to building Asia’s critical infrastructure

    By Thiam Hee Ng on Thursday, 10 April 2014

    The global market for sukuk – or Islamic debt securities – has soared from a tiny US$15 billion in 2001 to US$281 billion in 2013. Helping issuers tap the large pool of funds seeking shari’ah-compliant investments would help lower the cost of financing infrastructure, while the innovative profit-sharing structures of some sukuk could also lower the risk of financing such projects.

  • Bust the Gender Myths to Set Girls on Course for Future

    By Shanny Campbell on Monday, 31 March 2014

    How many of your childhood friends do you remember who climbed trees, drew imaginative pictures showing how things worked, built cities of Lego, rode bikes, constructed forts from blankets and furniture and invented elaborate games involving hiding, seeking, capturing … and getting really filthy?

  • World TB Day – Reaching the missing millions

    By Dr. Jean-Jacques Bernatas on Monday, 24 March 2014

    World Tuberculosis Day provides an important occasion to raise awareness about a disease that continues to affect millions of people around the globe.

  • Giving Asia’s elderly care and dignity

    By on Tuesday, 04 March 2014

    There is a seemingly hidden problem for Asia in providing economic, social and emotional security for the elderly. But drawing on the experiences of more developed economies, I think there is a silver lining behind this – an opportunity if actions are taken now to provide care and to give dignity to the elderly in Asia.

  • Safe migration for women to reduce human trafficking risks

    By Sonomi Tanaka on Monday, 03 March 2014

    Written by Sonomi Tanaka
     
    Radhika Coomaraswamy, a human rights lawyer and former UN Special Rapporteur on Violence Against Women, once said: “Traffickers fish in the stream of migration." What does this mean? It means that trafficking is more likely to occur within a series of migration, when men and women are on the move in search of new opportunities, better incomes and better lives in unfamiliar and strange surroundings. 
     

  • Closing the Gap – Policy options for tackling inequality

    By Max von Bonsdorff on Wednesday, 26 February 2014

    Recently IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde noted: “In too many countries, the benefits of growth are being enjoyed by far too few people”. She was making the point that high levels of inequality are a global concern.

  • No Impact Week ― the carbon ‘cleanse’ challenge

    By Anna Oposa on Monday, 24 February 2014

    Starting 22 February, Asian Development Bank (ADB) is holding its second No Impact Week challenge for individuals to cut their carbon footprint, following the success of the pilot event in January 2013.

  • Tackling rising inequality in Asia: the case for income support programs

    By on Thursday, 20 February 2014

    Christine Lagarde,  managing director of the IMF, recently warned that “in far too many countries the benefits of growth are being enjoyed by far too few people”. It’s hard to believe that this observation applies to Asia, though, where growth has been so successful at lifting millions of people out of poverty.  Surely, more growth must be the answer?

  • ‘Double Dividends’ from better urban management in the Pacific

    By on Wednesday, 19 February 2014

    A new report by Asian Development Bank (ADB), Moving from Risk to Resilience: Sustainable Urban Development in the Pacific, argues that efforts to improve urban management in the Pacific can improve both the quality of life in the region’s cities and towns and, at the same time, build greater resilience to natural hazards and climate change-induced events.

  • The relevance of $1.25 - recounting the poor

    By Anuradha Rajivan on Monday, 17 February 2014

    The Millennium Development Goals, which end in 2015, are a remarkable set of agreed global aspirations, with the world community committing to eradicate extreme poverty for the first time in history.

  • Saying NO to harassment

    By Shanny Campbell on Thursday, 13 February 2014

    Women are the majority users of public transport. This may be because they are less likely to drive a car than men, or less likely to have priority use of a family vehicle. They are also more likely than men to be poor, making the ownership, re-fuelling and maintenance of a motor vehicle less of an option, especially for women in many developing countries. We can add this to the pervasive gender stereotypes in some countries dictating whether it is culturally appropriate for women to drive a car, take a bus, or even travel at all, especially on their own.

  • New health hope for India's urban poor

    By Susann Roth on Wednesday, 12 February 2014

    The continued urban boom across Asia and the Pacific offers a host of exciting new opportunities for the region but it also presents huge challenges― not least in the critical field of health.

  • Asia Pacific post-2015 priorities, MDG8 and Global Partnerships

    By Stephen P. Groff on Tuesday, 11 February 2014

    Any contemporary story on development in Asia-Pacific begins with reflection on massive gains achieved in the fight against poverty. The incidence of people living on less than $1.25 a day fell from 54.5% in 1990 to 20.7% in 2010, with the number of extreme poor declining from 1.48 billion to 733 million. This precipitous decline in poverty incidence has been accompanied by tremendous gains in access to health and education.

  • View chart in <a href="http://blogs.adb.org/sites/default/files/poverty-chart-full.png">full</a>.

    Eradicating Absolute Poverty by 2030 - are we aiming too low?

    By Indu Bhushan on Monday, 10 February 2014

    The Post-2015 development agenda is leaning toward a goal of eradicating absolute poverty by 2030. The World Bank’s recently approved corporate strategy has the same goal. I believe, however, that this target is absolutely meaningless for our region, Asia and the Pacific.

  • Building a Better World: Youth and Governance

    By Haidy Ear-Dupuy on Wednesday, 05 February 2014

    Young people today live in a difficult world.  There are more graduates than jobs in the market, the environment is more degraded than ever before, and competition to earn a living and have the same quality of life as the previous generation is increasingly difficult.

  • Population dynamics, health and social protection – Opportunities for sustainable development

    By on Monday, 03 February 2014

    The world population clock is ticking. According to the Population Reference Bureau’s “2013 World Population Data Sheet”, on average, 271 people are born worldwide every minute and 106 people die. On 31 October 2011 the world welcomed its 7 billionth citizen and by 2050 it is estimated the number will have grown to 9.6 billion.

  • Universal Health Coverage – the Holy Grail for equitable health outcomes?

    By Susann Roth on Thursday, 30 January 2014

    Director-General of the World Health Organization, Margaret Chan, describes Universal Health Coverage (UHC) as ‘the most powerful concept that public health has to offer’.

  • (Not) Talking “HIV/AIDS” in the Philippines

    By Susann Roth on Sunday, 01 December 2013

    Many of the Filipinos, I have gotten to know over the last 8 years, say that their love lives are strongly influenced by their passionate, emotional culture and Catholic up-bringing. 

  • Why universal health coverage needs better measurements

    By Susann Roth on Monday, 07 October 2013

    The issue of universal health coverage (UHC) is a hot topic these days. The WHO director general Margaret Chan calls it: “the single most powerful concept that public health has to offer”. 

  • Social protection demystified: Are we covered? Worker’s worth in fast-changing Asia

    By on Wednesday, 11 September 2013

    In an often harsh and unpredictable world, social protection schemes provide an essential buffer against extreme events like job losses, as well as support during times of ill health or in old age, but in Developing Asia coverage levels are falling well short of the region’s vast needs. 

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